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Pfälzer Waldpfad Complete Trail

· 6 reviews · Long Distance Hiking · Pfalz
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  • Pfälzer Waldpfad
    / Pfälzer Waldpfad
    Video: Deutscher Wanderverband
  • / Unterhammer im Moosalbtal
    Photo: Dominik Ketz, Pfalz Touristik e.V.
  • / trekking-Award 2021
    Photo: trekking Magazin
  • / "Brücke" über die Moosalbe
    Photo: Tobias Kauf, Pfalz Touristik e.V.
  • / Perdsbrunner Weiher
    Photo: Dominik Ketz, Pfalz Touristik e.V.
  • / Am Humberg
    Photo: Dominik Ketz, Pfalz Touristik e.V.
  • / Das Karlstal bei Trippstadt
    Photo: Dominik Ketz, Pfalz Touristik e.V.
  • / Karlstalschlucht bei Trippstadt
    Photo: Dominik Ketz, Pfalz Touristik e.V.
  • / Waldiylle pur
    Photo: Dominik Ketz, Pfalz Touristik e.V.
  • / Kieselweiher
    Photo: Dominik Ketz, Pfalz Touristik e.V.
  • / Luitpoldturm - Ausblick auf 300 Gipfel
    Photo: Dominik Ketz, Pfalz Touristik e.V.
  • / Seelenfelsen Waldfischbach
    Photo: Dominik Ketz, Pfalz Touristik e.V.
  • / Hahnfels bei Erfweiler
    Photo: Dominik Ketz, Pfalz Touristik e.V.
  • / Burgmassiv Alt Dahn
    Photo: Dominik Ketz, Pfalz Touristik e.V.
  • / Wasgaublick bei Schindhard
    Photo: Dominik Ketz, Pfalz Touristik e.V.
  • / Burg Berwartstein
    Photo: KGP, KGP
  • / Wegelogo und Markierung Pfälzer Waldpfad
    Photo: Pfalz Touristik e.V.
m 800 700 600 500 400 300 200 100 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 km Deutsches Weintor Burgruine Gräfenstein Paddelweiher PWV-Hilschberghaus Johanniskreuz Jungfernsprung
The 140km long Pfälzer Waldpfad trail offers spectacular rocks, deep valleys and above all – forest as far as the eye can see!
moderate
Distance 144.3 km
38:00 h
3,058 m
3,088 m
Stage 1: Kaiserslautern to Finsterbrunnertal
From Kaiserslautern, the first stage of the Pfälzer Waldpfad trail brings us on a route about 16km long through pretty forests to the Humberg Tower, with its great views, and on into the Moosalbe Valley, where we reach our destination of the ‘Naturfreundehaus Finsterbrunnertal’ guest house and campsite.

Stage 2: Finsterbrunnertal to Johanniskreuz
At only 12km, the second stage is the shortest part of the Pfälzer Waldpfad trail. It brings us along the Moosalbe River through the Karlstal ravine and 470m up to the hamlet of Johanniskreuz.

Stage 3: Johanniskreuz to Heltersberg
The third stage of the Pfälzer Waldpfad trail takes us from Johanniskreuz to Heltersberg, through thick forest and river valleys with idyllic little lakes.

Stage 4: Heltersberg to Rodalben
The fourth stage of the trail leads us past the imposing Seelen rocks to the remains of a Roman castle named ‘Heidelsburg’, before bringing us to the place of pilgrimage at Maria Rosenberg and finally to the end point at Rodalben.

Stage 5: Rodalben to Merzalben
The fifth stage of the Pfälzer Waldpfad trail leads us from the Hilschberghaus rest stop past Rodalben and the Birkwieserhof farm for 10km before arriving at the end of the stage in Merzalben.

Stage 6: Merzalben to Hauenstein
The 23km long sixth stage of the trail is not only the longest section of the route, it also boasts the highest point of the trail with the 607m high Weißenberg and the breath-taking views from the top to reward you for your exertions.

Stage 7: Hauenstein to Dahn
The seventh stage of the trail brings us from the town of Hauenstein, famous for its shoe industry, to Dahn, the 'capital' of the Dahner Felsenland, known for its red sandstone rock formations. Just before the end of the route, we find the Jungfernsprung, one of the most famous rocks in the Palatinate.

Stage 8: Dahn to Erlenbach
On the eighth stage of the trail from Dahn to Erlenbach we pass some impressive rock formations and the ruined castles of Altdahn, Grafendahn, Tanstein and Drachenfels perching dramatically on the red sandstone massif.

Stage 9: Erlenbach to Schweigen-Rechtenbach
From Erlenbach, the last stage of the trail brings us past the impressive Berwartstein Castle to Schweigen, the most southerly town on the German Wine Route. We walk through Alsace (France) for a few kilometres and have a great view from the Rhine plain to the Black Forest.

 

UFFBASSE! - Campaign for being considerate of others in nature

  • Always act in a proactive, friendly and considerate way towards everyone you encounter along the way.
  • Respect nature, do not destroy plants and always stay on the paths. Try to avoid excessive noise and leave the forest before dusk.
  • Remember to take a rubbish bag with you when you go out and take your rubbish back home.
  • Please keep your dog on a leash at all times. Other visitors and animals thank you.
  • For your own safety, observe all road closures, including at weekends.
  • Park only in designated parking areas. Leave space for emergency vehicles and agricultural machinery.
  • Please give priority to agricultural and forestry traffic.

Author’s recommendation

Profile picture of Tobias Kauf
Author
Tobias Kauf 
Update: October 14, 2021
Quality route according to "Wanderbares Deutschland"
Difficulty
moderate
Technique
Stamina
Experience
Landscape
Highest point
597 m
Lowest point
178 m
Best time of year
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec

Rest Stop

Cafe Nicklis
Gaststätte Kaninchenzuchtverein P113
Naturfreundehaus Finsterbrunnertal
Restaurant Immenhof
PWV-Hilschberghaus
Landgasthof-Hotel "Zum Ochsen"
Dorfstübel am Schuhmuseum
Paddelweiher
German Wine Gate, Schweigen-Rechtenbach
Hotel Am Hirschhorn
Berwartstein Castle
Naturfreundehaus Heltersberg
Waldrestaurant St.Germanshof
PWV-Gräfensteinhütte
Wanderheim "Dicke Eiche"
Unterhammerbräu
PWV Drachenfelshütte
Paddelweiher-Hütte
Forsthaus Meisenhalde

Safety information

In light of recent events:

Coronavirus Guide from the German Hiking Association

 

In autumn in particular, it is important to remember that leaves lying on the ground can hide bumps, roots, stones and holes in the path. Trees can topple and branches can fall down after thunderstorms and rainstorms. Natural paths can become muddy and slippery, especially in poor weather conditions. Not all rocks and precipices are secured with ropes or railings. You need to be sure-footed in certain areas. Damage to paths of this kind is to be expected on hikes. If you feel that certain sections of the path are not passable for you, please avoid them.

 

NOTE:

We endeavour to announce all closures due to forest work or hunting parties on this platform. Nevertheless, sometimes there are situations where hiking trails are closed and we may not have been informed. If you unexpectedly encounter a road closure or diversion, please follow the instructions for your own safety.

Tips and hints

Die Pfalz zählt zu den drei schönsten Wanderregionen im deutschsprachigen Raum: Das ist die Meinung der Leser des Fachmagazins trekking. Beim sogenannten trekking-Award 2021 standen alle Regionen (knapp 70), die 2020 in dem Magazin vorgestellt worden waren, zur Wahl, darunter die Pfalz. 6500 Leser stimmten ab und wählten die Pfalz in der Kategorie "Die schönsten Wanderregionen in Deutschland/Österreich/Schweiz" auf den dritten Platz. Damit konnte sich die Pfalz vor namenhaften Konkurrenten wie Berchtesgadener Alpen (Platz 4) oder Tannheimer Tal (Platz 5) platzieren.

Wandern ohne Gepäck

Start

Kaiserslautern central station (243 m)
Coordinates:
DD
49.436380, 7.768518
DMS
49°26'11.0"N 7°46'06.7"E
UTM
32U 410716 5476696
w3w 
///mugs.latter.flopped

Destination

Deutsches Weintor Schweigen-Rechtenbach

Turn-by-turn directions

Stage 1: Kaiserslautern to Finsterbrunnertal
The first stage of the Pfälzer Waldpfad trail begins at Kaiserslautern central train station and it's not far from here to the southern outskirts of the city. We hike from here through thick forest uphill to the Humberg Tower. The tower is almost 36m high and was built in 1900. It offers a fantastic view of the northern Palatine Forest, the city of Kaiserslautern with the impressive Fritz-Walter stadium and the Donnersberg, the highest mountain in the Palatinate. The trail continues through the forest to 'Rote Hohl', with an old crossroads at the top of the pass between Kaiserslautern and the Aschbach Valley. After reaching the outskirts of Dansenberg, we descend into the Aschbach Valley and pass the Jagdhausweiher lake. The route leads us past the Alte Schmelz riding centre and guest house to the Blaukopf plateau and finally down into the Moosalbe Valley. The end point of this stage, the ‘Naturfreundehaus Finsterbrunnertal’ guest house lies at the entrance to a small side valley.

Stage 2: Finsterbrunnertal to Johanniskreuz
From the Naturfreundehaus Finsterbrunnertal we follow the Moosalbe upstream, passing various monuments of the former ironwork industry in the Palatinate, including the three former production facilities at Oberhammer, Mittelhammer and Unterhammer. Today there is a café at Unterhammer, in whose idyllic surroundings we can pause for a moment. You can also stop at the Klug’sche Mühle Restaurant/Café, which we pass shortly after leaving Unterhammer. At Mittelhammer we follow the Moosalbe into the imposing Karlstal ravine where a small river, with rapids and waterfalls, flows past huge rocks and steep red sandstone cliffs. At the top of the ravine is Oberhammer and we walk on through the now wider and more gentle valley. We take a small forest path to reach the 'Moosalbsprung' springs, where we can stop for a moment to enjoy the water. At the end of the valley we climb the forest paths to Johanniskreuz, where our hike ends at the Haus der Nachhaltigkeit – Centre for Sustainable Living. You can also stay overnight in Johanniskreuz and enjoy the local cuisine.

Stage 3: Johanniskreuz to Heltersberg
The Pfälzer Waldpfad trail leads us back into the forest from the large car park of the Centre for Sustainable Living, past the 'Hindenburgkiefer' natural monument. We hike down to the Schwarzbach Valley and take the easy paths to the Burgalbweiher pond. The trail then follows the right side of the valley, over the Schwarzbach River. We climb over a hill to reach the catchment area of the Hahnenseybach River, and, rather than descending, we follow the slope to the Molkenbrunnen springs. It's worth resting here for a moment before continuing on past mossy green rocks to the Kieselweiher lake. After another ascent, we follow a service road over the hill, before crossing the Hundsbächel Valley and making the final ascent to Heltersberg. The Heltersberg Naturfreundehaus guest house, restaurant and visitor centre at the edge of the forest offers a chance to have something to eat and to rest. From here, the end point of this stage of the trail, the bus stop in Heltersberg town centre, is only a few hundred metres away.

Stage 4: Heltersberg to Rodalben
The fourth stage of our hike takes us out of Heltersberg and across the fields past Weststrichhof into the forest. From there, we have a fairly long hike over the hill before reaching the impressive Seelen rocks high over the Schwarzbach Valley. We follow the trail past these rocks into a small side valley and then up to the remains of a Roman castle named ‘Heidelsburg’, which once served as a defence against Germanic invasions. The trail then leads us through the Schwarzbach Valley to a former smithy. We leave the valley here and hike over the hill through meadows and fields to the place of pilgrimage at Maria Rosenberg, with its pilgrim church and Virgin Mary grotto. A short ascent from here brings us to Donsieders. Leaving the church of this small hamlet behind us, we follow the Höhgasse out of the hamlet and continue uphill to the Orleberg plateau. Here you can admire an imposing red sandstone monolith, surrounded by fields and accompanied by a plaque with a poem about the legend of Donsieders. The trail continues through the forest past some distinctive rock features to the outskirts of Rodalben, where we arrive at the Hilschberghaus rest stop. This hut, managed by the PWV (Pfälzerwaldverein – local association), is open from 12pm Monday - Saturday and from 10am on Sundays and holidays.

Stage 5: Rodalben to Merzalben
Stealing a final view of Rodalben from the terrace of the Hilschberghaus (PWV, opening hours: Mon-Sat from 12pm/Sundays and holidays from 10.00am), we then continue on curving paths on the slopes above the town, until the descent into the Rodalbe Valley. We reach the farmstead of the old Birkwieserhof farm by following the river through a small side valley. The last section of this stage brings us along more curving forest paths to Merzalben. We pass the church, which stands on the left of the main road, and arrive at our final destination at the Zimmerbergstraße junction.

Stage 6: Merzalben to Hauenstein
The so-called 'King's stage' of the Pfälzer Waldpfad trail begins in the centre of Merzalben, on the corner of the Hauptstraße/Zimmerbergstraße streets. It then leads us into the forest and after a short ascent to the ruins of Gräfenstein Castle, which dates from the era of the Swabian dynasty in the Middle Ages. Equipped with the torches we have brought with us, we can explore the castle's seven-cornered keep and enjoy the view over Merzalben and, in the distance, the rolling green hills of the Palatinate Forest. We leave the castle and return to the car park, where we can begin our ascent to Winschertkopf. This mighty red sandstone rock stands on a hill and towers high over the Merzalbe Valley. After enjoying the magnificent views once again, we continue through the forest on gently undulating paths and gradually ascend to the top of the Weißenberg. At 607m above sea level, this is the highest point on the Pfälzer Waldpfad trail. We can enjoy another magnificent view from the Luitpold Tower, this time of the largest continuously forested area in Germany. We then descend to the hamlet of Hermersbergerhof and from there past the ruins of Falkenburg castle and into the Queich Valley. We can make a quick detour to visit Wilgartswiesen, with its twin-towered sandstone church, before reaching our final destination of Hauenstein.

Stage 7: Hauenstein to Dahn
At the start of the stage we hike past some rocks to the Felsentor, the northernmost entrance to Hauenstein, where the road (Bahnhofstraße) runs through two steeply rising rock walls. The trail then brings us along the slopes above Hauenstein to Paddelweiher lake, and then follows the Queich upstream to its source. We can refresh our tired feet with a quick walk through the newly-added wading pool or sit down on the conveniently placed benches nearby. The next ascent should be a bit easier after this refreshing rest stop. At the end of the ascent we are rewarded with the Dicke Eiche (PWV) rest stop and restaurant (opening hours: weekends and holidays 9am - 6pm, from May - October also on Wednesdays 10am - 6pm, closed 25.12, 26.12 and 01.01). Enjoy some typical Palatine cuisine accompanied by a glass of wine or a beer straight from the tap. Duly refreshed and ready to go again, we pass the namesake of the Dicke Eiche – a large oak tree which was vandalised many years ago and now stands as a stump on the edge of the clearing where it once stood in all its glory. Our next stop is the Winterkirchel – a little chapel in the forest. The trail brings us down the valley to the outskirts of Erfweiler and then along the slopes of the Wölmersberg mountain to the outskirts of Dahn. We then tackle the considerable ascent up to the Lachberg. Following the rock ridge, we eventually reach the Jungfernsprung, a high rocky outcrop which is a landmark of the nearby town of Dahn. From here we descend to Dahn town centre, where the seventh stage comes to an end.

Stage 8: Dahn to Erlenbach
From Dahn we follow the Pfälzer Waldpfad trail to the Ehren cemetery, with its St Michael Chapel and its picturesque location directly underneath the rock massif of the Hochstein mountain. The trail then leads us through the woods over the hill to the castles of Altdahn, Grafendahn and Tanstein. The ruins of these three castles are perched high above Dahn on a red sandstone rocky crag. We then descend to Erfweiler, walking through the village and through the woods to the viewing point on the opposite slope of the Kahlenberg mountain, on the edges of a pine forest flooded with light. After passing another viewing point on the summit of the Kahlenberg, the trail brings us down to the outskirts of Schindhard and further through the woods to Busenberg. From there we can walk to the ruins of Drachenfels Castle, which stands, like the castles at Dahn, on a massive red sandstone rock. Not far from the ruins is the Drachenfels Hut (run by PWV, a local association) where we can enjoy something to eat before our last descent, which brings us to Erlenbach. The Drachenfels Hut is open all year round (except for Christmas and New Year), Wednesdays from 11am, Saturdays from 12pm and Sundays and holidays from 9am.

Stage 9: Erlenbach to Schweigen-Rechtenbach
The final stage of the Pfälzer Waldpfad trail brings us from Erlenbach to Berwartstein Castle, the only castle of the Wasgau area still inhabited today. Next we pass the Seehof-Weiher, great for swimming during hot weather, and follow the Portzbach downstream to just before it flows into the Wieslauter. The trail now leads us through the forest on curving paths on the slopes north of the Wieslauter to the St Germanshof inn, which lies directly on the German-French border. A little later we reach French territory. Shortly after reaching the edge of the forest, there is an amazing view to our right of the North Alsace town of Wissembourg. In clear conditions, this view can extend as far as the Hornisgrinde mountain in the Black Forest. We hike through the vineyards and back into German territory over an actual green border (an international border in the countryside) and down the slope to Schweigen, at the foot of the hills. Here we reach the German Wine Gate which marks both the end of the German Wine Route and our hike. A walk around the historical old town of Wissembourg is highly recommended. And of course you shouldn't miss the opportunity to finish your trip with a visit to a winemaker. If you still haven't had enough of hiking, the wine tasting session can serve as a prelude to the Pfälzer Weinsteig trail.

Note


all notes on protected areas

Public transport

Train to Kaiserslautern (ICE stop)

Getting there

A63 or A6 to Mainz-Kaiserslautern junction or Kaiserslautern-West exit

Parking

At Kaiserslautern central station

Coordinates

DD
49.436380, 7.768518
DMS
49°26'11.0"N 7°46'06.7"E
UTM
32U 410716 5476696
w3w 
///mugs.latter.flopped
Arrival by train, car, foot or bike

Book recommendation by the author

Rother Bergverlag : Die Pfälzer Weitwanderwege Pfälzer Höhenweg, Pfälzer Waldpfad, Pfälzer Weinsteig. In 30 Tagen durch die Pfalz (Autor: Jürgen Plogmann). 140 Seiten mit 60 Farbabbildungen, 30 Höhenprofile, 30 Wanderkärtchen im Maßstab 1:75.000, eine Übersichtskarte. ISBN 978-3-7633-4401-7 

Author’s map recommendations

  • Public Press Wanderkarte Pfälzer Höhenweg im Maßstab 1:25.000, deutsch, Leporello Falzung mit 22 Teilkarten, GPS-genau, sechs redaktionelle Seiten mit Ausflugszielen und Einkehrtipps. Weitere Hauptwanderwege enthalten. Preis: 11,99 €. Direkt hier bestellen.
  • Wanderkarte Pfälzerwald 3, 5, 7 und 8, NaturNavi Gmbh, ISBN 978-3-96099-104-5 http://naturnavi.de

Equipment

We recommend the following equipment as standard for our hiking tours:
  • Sturdy shoes
  • Clothing suitable for the weather
  • Sun and rain protection
  • Sufficient quantity of food and drink, as refreshment stops or shopping facilities are not always available or open.
  • Although the paths are very well marked throughout, for safety reasons it is always advisable to carry a suitable hiking map so that you can quickly find your way to a safe area in the event of a thunderstorm or emergency.

Questions and answers

Question from Phil Wafs · May 24, 2020 · Community
Gibt es entlang des Weges genügend Quellen oder Brunnen, um sich zum Beispiel autark versorgen zu können, falls Geschäfte / Gasthöfe geschlossen sind?
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Answered by klaus roehrle  · May 25, 2020 · Community
Wir haben mit der Versorgung kein Problem gehabt. Und ausserdem kann man auch mal fragen, ob man Wasser bekommt. Es sind immer Ortschaften zu durchqueren. Viel Spass beim Wandern
1 more reply11111

Rating

4.5
(6)
Martin Böttcher
August 24, 2020 · Community
Schöne Tour durch den Pfälzer Wald. Leider ist der Anteil an Forstwegen mit Schotter sehr hoch. Ich bin die Strecke in 7 Tagen gelaufen. Am ersten Tag bin ich wie empfohlen von Kaiserslautern zum Naturfreundehaus im Finsterbrunnertal gelaufen. Die Strecke war vom Bahnhof aus sehr gut ausgeschildert und nur die letzten Kilometer waren auf Schotter. Das Essen bei den Naturfreunden war gut und die Mitarbeiter dort waren sehr nett und hilfsbereit. Zum Übernachten gibt es oberhalb vom Naturfreundehaus einige schöne Felsvorsprünge und zum baden einen schönen Bach. Am zweiten Tag bin ich eine Doppeletappe bis zum Naturfreundehaus in Heltersberg gelaufen. Bis zum Johanneskreuz läuft man lange durch ein wunderschönes Tal und kurz bevor man oben ist gibt es noch eine gute Quelle zum die Wasservorräte aufzufüllen. Auchtung beim Johanneskreuz wenn überhaupt nur im Cafe Nicklis einkehren! Ist aber auch nicht so der Bringer. Sind aber sehr nett, hilfsbereit und eine gute Möglichkeit das Handy aufzuladen. Nach dem Johanneskreuz sind noch ca. 2/3 Kilometer schöne Waldwege und dann bis fast an das Naturfreundehaus schlimmste Schotterautobahnen und stark bewirtschafteten Wälder. Das Naturfreundehaus Heltersberg hat super Essen und mangels schöner Übernachtungsgelegenheit im Wald hab ich dort auch recht günstig übernachtet. Die dritte Etappe bin ich dann wieder wie empfohlen zum PWV-Haus in Rodalben gelaufen. Das Essen ist wie in allen PWV Hütten. Kein Salat und Gemüse dafür jede Menge Zusatzstoffe. Die Übernachtungspreise für eine Nacht recht hoch. Da es aber die ganze Nacht gewittert und geregnet hat war es mir das Wert. Die vierte Etappe hab ich etwas verlängert und kurz vor dem Luitpoldturm unter einem schönen Felsvorsprung übernachtet. In Merzalben gibt es direkt an der Wanderstrecke einen Quellwasserbrunnen mit Wassertretbecken. Oberhalb von Merzalben gibt es einen schönen Aussichtspunkt und danach noch die Burg Gräfenstein. Der Schotterweganteil ist wieder recht hoch. Die fünfte Etappe bin ich über Hauenstein bis kurz vor die PWV-Hütte Dicke Eiche gelaufen. Am Aufstieg zur Hütte gibt es einen schönen Felsvorsprung. Achtung kurz vor Hauenstein gibt es eine Umleitung! Ansonsten hat man vom Luitpoldturm eine tolle Aussicht. Die sechste Etappe bin ich ganz entspannt über Dahn nach Erfweiler zum Dorfblickfelsen gelaufen. Am Dorfblickfelsen über Erfweiler hat man einen schönen Sonnenuntergang und Übernachtungsgelegenheit. Die siebte Etappe bin ich nur mangels Übernachtungsgelegenheit bis zum Deutschen Weintor gelaufen. Die über 30 Kilometer mit schwerem Gepäck und 30 Grad waren doch recht heftig und ab der Ruine Drachenfels ist man nur noch auf Schotterwegen unterwegs. Die Trinkwasserversorgung auf der gesamten Strecke ist kein Problem und Einkehrmöglichkeiten gibt es bei guter Planung fast jeden Tag. Einkaufen ohne große Umwege kann man in Rodalben, Hauenstein und Dahn. Ich würde aufgrund des sehr hohen Schotterweganteils die Strecke kein zweites Mal laufen.
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Photo: Martin Böttcher, Community
Photo: Martin Böttcher, Community
Photo: Martin Böttcher, Community
Photo: Martin Böttcher, Community
Photo: Martin Böttcher, Community
Photo: Martin Böttcher, Community
Photo: Martin Böttcher, Community
Christine Grünauer
October 06, 2018 · Community
Hotel Johanniskreuz - Achtung Abzocke ! Als Wanderer auf dem Pfälzer Waldpfad hat man in Johanniskreuz kaum eine Möglichkeit eine andere Übernachtung zu finden (wir haben uns später sagen lassen, es gäbe ca. 2 km weiter eine nette Pension). Die Zimmer im Hotel Johanniskreuz sind für den Standard absolut überteuert. Zu Essen gab es angeblich wegen des schlechten Wetters lediglich 4 Gerichte, eine Speisekarte wurde uns nicht gegeben, auch vorab keine Preise genannt. Die 4 Gericht kosteten alle um die 25 ,-- Euro zzgl. 13,50 Euro pro großem Salat. Als Frühstück wurde uns als einzige Möglichkeit eine Rühreipfanne für 13,50 Euro angeboten, die wir dankend abgelehnt haben. Anscheinend betreibt der Inhaber diese Art Geschäft schon seit längerem, wir können alle nur dringend warnen dort hinzugehen und diese Abzocke weiter zu unterstützen. Schade, dass wir nicht vorher die Kommentare in Tripadvisor gelesen hatten. Beibt WEG !
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When did you do this route? September 22, 2018
Philipp Peters
November 02, 2017 · Community
Sehr Traumhafter Weg mit teils richtig schönen und mystischen Stellen. Gewandert in 6 Tagen. Felsvorsprünge und kleine Höhlen am ganzen weg bieten gute Übernachtungsmöglichkeiten.
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Photos from others

+ 3

Reviews
Difficulty
moderate
Distance
144.3 km
Duration
38:00 h
Ascent
3,058 m
Descent
3,088 m
Multi-stage route Scenic Refreshment stops available Family-friendly Cultural/historical interest Geological highlights Botanical highlights Flora and fauna

Statistics

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Features
2D 3D
Maps and trails
  • 9 Stages
recommended route Difficulty moderate Stage 1
Distance 16.9 km
Duration 4:45 h
Ascent 468 m
Descent 419 m

From Kaiserslautern, the first stage of the Pfälzer Waldpfad trail brings us on a route about 16km long through pretty forests to the Humberg Tower ...

7
from Tobias Kauf,   Pfalz Touristik e.V.
recommended route Difficulty moderate Stage 2
Distance 11.7 km
Duration 3:45 h
Ascent 265 m
Descent 65 m

At only 12km, the second stage is the shortest section of the Pfälzer Waldpfad trail. It brings us along the Moosalbe River through the Karlstal ...

10
from Tobias Kauf,   Pfalz Touristik e.V.
recommended route Difficulty moderate Stage 3
Distance 14.4 km
Duration 4:05 h
Ascent 294 m
Descent 323 m

The third stage of the Pfälzer Waldpfad trail takes us from Johanniskreuz to Heltersberg, through thick forest and river valleys with idyllic ...

3
from Tobias Kauf,   Pfalz Touristik e.V.
recommended route Difficulty moderate Stage 4
Distance 17.9 km
Duration 3:45 h
Ascent 471 m
Descent 585 m

The fourth stage of the trail leads us past the imposing Seelen rocks to the remains of a Roman castle named ‘Heidelsburg’, before bringing us to ...

5
from Tobias Kauf,   Pfalz Touristik e.V.
recommended route Difficulty moderate Stage 5
Distance 10.4 km
Duration 4:35 h
Ascent 239 m
Descent 280 m

The fifth stage of the Pfälzer Waldpfad trail leads us from the Hilschberghaus rest stop past Rodalben and the Birkwieserhof farm for 10km before ...

2
from Tobias Kauf,   Pfalz Touristik e.V.
recommended route Difficulty difficult Stage 6
Distance 22.3 km
Duration 6:45 h
Ascent 451 m
Descent 481 m

The 23km long sixth stage of the trail is not only the longest section of the route, it also boasts the highest point of the trail with the 607m ...

3
from Tobias Kauf,   Pfalz Touristik e.V.
recommended route Difficulty moderate Stage 7
Distance 15.4 km
Duration 4:55 h
Ascent 446 m
Descent 479 m

The seventh stage of the trail brings us from the town of Hauenstein, famous for its shoe industry, to Dahn, the 'capital' of the Dahner Felsenland ...

3
from Tobias Kauf,   Pfalz Touristik e.V.
Long Distance Hiking · Pfalz
Pfälzer Waldpfad Stage 8: Dahn - Erlenbach
recommended route Difficulty moderate Stage 8
Distance 17 km
Duration 5:10 h
Ascent 468 m
Descent 464 m

On the eighth stage of the trail from Dahn to Erlenbach we pass some impressive rock formations and the ruined castles of Altdahn, Grafendahn, ...

2
from Tobias Kauf,   Pfalz Touristik e.V.
recommended route Difficulty moderate Stage 9
Distance 17.2 km
Duration 5:15 h
Ascent 524 m
Descent 511 m

From Erlenbach, the last stage of the trail brings us past the impressive Berwartstein Castle to Schweigen, the most southerly town on the German ...

2
from Tobias Kauf,   Pfalz Touristik e.V.
Duration : h
Distance  km
Ascent  m
Descent  m
Highest point  m
Lowest point  m
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